OC52A:
Interdisciplinary Approaches for Understanding the Biological Consequences of Global Ocean Change II

Session ID#: 92417

Session Description:
As anthropogenic forcing of marine systems continues, biological responses will have dramatic consequences for the structure and function of marine ecosystems. Manipulative experiments, ocean observations, and quantitative models are three foundational research approaches for understanding the responses of marine species to future environmental change. Investments in biogeochemical tools and ocean observing time series, along with advances in ocean ecosystem and biogeochemical modeling, have afforded us a greatly improved perspective on global change in the ocean. This session will focus on the new generation of ocean environmental change studies that cross disciplinary boundaries. We welcome submissions that link manipulative experimental approaches in the laboratory or field with ocean observations, time series measurements, and/or quantitative modeling approaches as well as contributions that make connections across levels of organization (molecular to global-level processes), spatial scales (nm-km), and temporal scales (past, present, future). Suggested topics include (1) organismal response to changes in abiotic conditions (e.g. multi-stressors) over ecological and geological timescales, (2) links between environmental exposures and organismal performance, and (3) biophysical feedbacks.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • IS - Ocean Observatories, Instrumentation and Sensing Technologies
  • OB - Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate
Index Terms:
Primary Chair:  Emily Bethana Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States
Co-chairs:  David A Hutchins1, Catherine V Davis2 and Naomi Marcil Levine1, (1)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States(2)UC Davis, Petaluma, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Emily Bethana Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States
Moderators:  Emily Bethana Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States and Catherine V Davis, UC Davis, Petaluma, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Emily Bethana Rivest, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Biological Sciences, Gloucester Point, VA, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Predicted Marine Climate Change: Influence of Elevated Temperature and lowered pH on Feeding preference and Egg production of Cyclopoid Copepod Oithona rigida (651449)
Umer Khalifa Saleemraja and Vinitha Dr. Ebenezer, Sathyabama Institute of Science and Technology, Center for Climate Change Studies, Chennai, India
Bidirectional thermal limitations on invertebrate respiration drive habitat compression in response to climate change (656558)
Thomas H Boag, Stanford University, Department of Geology, Stanford, CA, United States, Curtis A. Deutsch, University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, United States, Leanne E Elder, Yale University, Geology and Geophysics, New Haven, CT, United States, Andy Marquez, Stanford University, Department of Geological Sciences, United States, Pincelli M Hull, Yale University, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, New Haven, CT, United States and Erik A Sperling, Stanford University, Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford, United States
Resistance of a reef-building coral to hypoxia (657424)
Maggie D Johnson, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Marine Station, Fort Pierce, FL, United States; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City, Panama, Sara D Swaminathan, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States, Emily N Nixon, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Marine Station, Fort Pierce, United States, Valerie J Paul, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Marine Station, Ft. Pierce, FL, United States and Andrew H Altieri, University of Florida, Gainesville, United States
Localized Hypoxia May Have Caused Coral Reef Mortality at the Flower Garden Banks (654739)
Kathryn E F Shamberger, Texas A&M University, Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States, Andrea K Kealoha, Texas A&M University College Station, College Station, TX, United States, Shawn Doyle, Texas A&M University, Oceanography, College Station, TX, United States, Jason B Sylvan, Texas A&M University, Oceanography, College Station, United States, Robert D Hetland, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States and Steven Francis DiMarco, Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG), College Station, TX, United States
Modeling Hotspots of Jellyfish Blooms in Light of Climate Change in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (657352)
Chengxue Li and Hui Liu, Texas A&M University at Galveston, Marine Biology, Galveston, TX, United States
Harnessing computational genomics to explore the dynamics of rapid adaptation to ocean acidification (635775)
Mark C Bitter1, Lydia Kapsenberg2, Jean-Pierre Gattuso3 and Catherine A Pfister1, (1)University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States, (2)CSIC Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain, (3)Laboratoire d'Oceanographie de Villefranche, Paris, France
Decreasing Phanerozoic extinction intensity is a predictable consequence of Earth surface oxygenation and metazoan ecophysiology (656045)
Richard George George Stockey1, Andy Ridgwell2, Seth Finnegan3 and Erik A Sperling1, (1)Stanford University, Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford, United States, (2)University of California Riverside, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Riverside, CA, United States, (3)University of California Berkeley, Integrative Biology, Berkeley, CA, United States
Impact of temperature trends and ocean temperature surprises on natural and human communities (650876)
Andrew J Pershing, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME, United States and Nicholas Record, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, United States