CP21A:
Human Populations and Influences in the Coastal Zone: Effects on Ocean and Human Health (OHH) I

Session ID#: 92813

Session Description:
About 40% of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the coast generating unprecedented levels of interaction among people, microbial and algal assemblages, and natural and built environments. Population growth and increasing nutrient and pollutant discharges, coupled with increasing ocean temperatures, changing rainfall patterns, acidification, and rising sea levels will only exacerbate impacts of human activities on water quality, coastal ecosystems, aquaculture, fisheries, ecosystem function, and human health. Understanding the interplay of complex ecological, microbiological, biogeochemical, and nearshore oceanographic and hydrologic processes is necessary to mitigate the impact of human influence in the ocean, and determine risks for human health and well-being. Dramatic advances have been made in molecular and genomic methods, biogeochemical processes, and in situ and autonomous sampling and analysis. However, there is need for multi-disciplinary efforts to address linkages across scales, space, and approaches.

This session invites submissions that explore impacts of human activities and climate change on coastal marine and Great Lakes ecosystems, focusing on areas which affect human and animal health (natural and anthropogenic risks), coastal recreational or commercial shellfish harvesting, ocean acidification, nutrient discharge, impacts on aquaculture and ecosystem function, and algal blooms, fish kills, shellfish pathology, and other kinds of wildlife disease. Of particular interest are topics that involve integrated approaches combining cutting edge quantitative techniques, water movement, loading and flux assessments, novel modeling approaches, mechanisms of toxicity, and active stakeholder and community engagement that promotes a broader impact of the science and dissemination of research findings.

Co-Sponsor(s):
  • MM - Microbiology and Molecular Ecology
  • SI - Social-Ocean Science Interactions and SDGs
Index Terms:

1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4840 Microbiology and microbial ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4855 Phytoplankton [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
Primary Chair:  Frederick L Tyson, National Insitute of Environmental Health Sciences, Genes Environment and Health Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
Co-chairs:  Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States and Henrietta N Edmonds, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States
Moderators:  Henrietta N Edmonds, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States and Frederick L Tyson, National Insitute of Environmental Health Sciences, Genes Environment and Health Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Joshua A Steele, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States and Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Chapel Hill, NC, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Distribution of pathogenic vibrios in coastal water (649611)
Antarpreet Singh Jutla, University of Florida, Gainesville, United States, Rita R Colwell, University of Maryland College Park, Centre for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, College Park, MD, United States and Anwar Huq, University of Maryland's School of Public Health, Maryland, United States
OysterFutures: testing a collaborative modeling process to enhance fisheries and ecosystem health (656729)
Elizabeth W North1, Michael J Wilberg2, Jeff Blair3, Jeffrey C Cornwell4, Matthew Damiano2, Rasika Gawde5, Taylor Goelz6, Robert M Jones3, Troy W Hartley7, Chris Hayes2, Raleigh R Hood1, Melanie Leigh Jackson1, Emily Nastase8, Dylan Taillie8, Jane E Thomas9 and Lisa A Wainger2, (1)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD, United States, (2)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Solomons, MD, United States, (3)Florida State University, FCRC Concensus Center, Tallahassee, FL, United States, (4)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD, United States, (5)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD, United States, (6)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (7)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Virginia Sea Grant College Program, Gloucester Point, VA, United States, (8)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, United States, (9)University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Integration Application Network, Cambridge, MD, United States
The Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization on the Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Vibrio Bacteria Affecting Seafood Safety and Contact Recreation in the Coastal Zone (644195)
Geoffrey Scott, University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States, Saurabh I Chatterjee, Arnold School of Public Health , University of South Carolina, Environmental Health Sciences and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States, Cassandra Horton, University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Arnold School of Public Health and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States, Paul A. Sandifer, College of Charleston, Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health and the NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Charleston, SC, United States, Marie DeLorenzo, NOAA/NOS NCCOS, Charleston and Hollings Marine Laboratories, Charleston, SC, United States and R. Sean Norman, University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health and the NIEHS Funded Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, Columbia, SC, United States
Oceans and Human Health: The Great Lakes Center for Fresh Waters and Human Health at Bowling Green State University (637385)
George Bullerjahn, Bowling Green State University and and the Great Lakes Center for Fresh Waters and Human Health, Biological Sciences, Bowling Green, OH, United States
The complicated, no good, multifaceted and confusing reasons for Microcystis blooms. (637806)
Steven Wilhelm1, Robbie M Martin1, Lauren E Krausfeldt1, Helena L Pound1, Brittany N Zepernick1, Barbara Klein2, Gary R LeCleir1, Spiridon E Papoulis1, Hector F Castro3, Xiangming Tang4, David Talmy1, Ferdi Hellweger5, Ameet Pinto6, Erik Zinser7, Shawn R Campagna3 and Gregory L Boyer8, (1)The University of Tennessee, Microbiology, Knoxville, TN, United States, (2)The University of West Florida, Center for Environmental Diagnostics & Bioremediation, Pensacola, FL, United States, (3)The University of Tennessee, Chemistry, Knoxville, TN, United States, (4)Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taihu Laboratory for Lake Ecosystem Research, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Nanjing, China, (5)Technical University of Berlin, Water Quality Engineering, Berlin, Germany, (6)Northeastern University, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Boston, MA, United States, (7)University of Tennessee, Department of Microbiology, Knoxville, TN, United States, (8)State University of New York, Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, United States
Regional Monitoring for Sediment and Water Quality in the Urban Ocean of the Southern California Bight (652275)
Karen McLaughlin1, Ken Schiff2, Nina Bednarsek3, Bowen Du4, David Gillett1, John F Griffith5, Darrin Greenstein4, Ashley Parks4, Jayme Smith2 and Stephen Weisberg6, (1)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, (2)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, United States, (3)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Biogeochemistry, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, (4)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, United States, (5)Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Microbiology, Costa Mesa, CA, United States, (6)SCCWRP, Costa Mesa, CA, United States
The Greater Caribbean Center for Ciguatera Research: Climate Change and Human Health (651528)
Michael Parsons1, Robert Sobol2, Donald M Anderson3, Mindy Richlen4, Deana Erdner5, Alison Robertson6, Jennifer Pierce2, Jenna James2, Casey Daniel2, Tyler B Smith7 and Janel Lowman2, (1)Florida Gulf Coast University and the Greater Caribbean Center for Ciguatera Research, The Water School, Fort Myers, FL, United States, (2)University of South Alabama, Department of Pharmacology and Mitchell Cancer Institute, Mobile, AL, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (4)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Center for Oceans and Human Health, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (5)University of Texas, Marine Science Institute, Port Aransas, TX, United States, (6)Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, AL, United States, (7)University of the Virgin Islands, Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, St. Thomas, United States
The Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health: Focus and Findings (653169)
John Stegeman1, Donald M Anderson2, Dennis Joseph McGillicuddy Jr3, Mark E. Hahn2, Mindy Richlen4, Neel Aluru2, Michael Brosnahan5, Katherine Hubbard6, Jennifer M. Panlilio7 and David K Ralston8, (1)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Center for Oceans and Human Health, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oeanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (4)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Center for Oceans and Human Health, Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (5)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (6)Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Saint Petersburg, FL, United States, (7)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, United States, (8)WHOI, Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA, United States