IS12C:
New Technologies and Methods in Fisheries Science II

Session ID#: 93621

Session Description:
Appropriately managing fishery stocks for a sustainable future requires integrating data from disparate sources and ocean science disciplines, and fisheries scientists and managers face many challenges. In particular, measuring the natural variability in density, abundance, and productivity of fisheries populations across space and time and estimating mortality of target and non-target species prove often prove to be labor-intensive, expensive, and fraught with uncertainty. However, as consumer electronics become cheaper, faster, and more portable, fisheries scientists have access to new technologies and more computing power to better estimate these population parameters. In this session, we hope to bring together fisheries scientists and managers, as well as researchers from other ocean science disciplines, to discuss new technologies and methods currently in use and in development.
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • ME - Marine Ecology and Biodiversity
Index Terms:

4830 Higher trophic levels [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
4894 Instruments, sensors, and techniques [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL]
6344 System operation and management [POLICY SCIENCES & PUBLIC ISSUES]
Primary Chair:  Camille Pagniello, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Co-chairs:  Jack Butler, Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Marathon, FL, United States, Katherine Wilson, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, Silver Spring, MD, United States and Jules S Jaffe, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Primary Liaison:  Camille Pagniello, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States
Moderators:  Camille Pagniello, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California - San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States and Katherine Wilson, NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Student Paper Review Liaison:  Jack Butler, Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Marathon, FL, United States

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Advanced Camera Technologies and Artificial Intelligence to Improve Marine Resource Surveys (647288)
Benjamin Richards1, Anthony Hoogs2, Matthew David Dawkins3, Jeremy Taylor4, Steven G Smith5, Jerald S Ault5 and Michael P Seki6, (1)NOAA, Honolulu, HI, United States, (2)Kitware, Clifton Park, NY, United States, (3)Kitware, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States, (4)Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Honolulu, HI, United States, (5)University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Miami, FL, United States, (6)US Dept Commerce/NOAA/NMFS, Honolulu, HI, United States
There are Plenty of Fish in the Sea- Improved Optical Visibility Range for Automatic Fish Surveys and Monitoring (653459)
Deborah Levy1, Opher Bar Natan2 and Tali Treibitz1, (1)University of Haifa, Charney School Of Marine Sciences, Department of Marine Technologies, Haifa, Israel, (2)University of Haifa, Charney School of Marine Sciences, Department of Marine Technologies, Haifa, Israel
Exploring species dynamics within spiny lobster traps in the Florida Keys using a customizable, trap-deployable video camera system (646244)
Jack Butler1, Emily Hutchinson1, Cj Sweetman2 and Thomas R Matthews1, (1)Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Marathon, FL, United States, (2)Division of Marine Fisheries Management, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Marathon, FL, United States
Using a passive acoustic-optical imaging system to monitor fish presence and behavior in marine protected areas (648628)
Camille Pagniello1, Jack Butler2, Addison Sherwood1, Annie Rosen1, Paul Roberts3, Ed Parnell1, Jules S Jaffe1 and Ana Sirovic1,4, (1)Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2)Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Marathon, FL, United States, (3)Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, (4)Texas A&M University at Galveston, Galveston, TX, United States
Advances in fisheries science through emerging observing technologies (637053)
Hassan Moustahfid, NOAA/NOS/US Integrated Ocean Observing System, Silver Spring, United States, William Michaels, NOAA. Fisheries, US DOC, Silver Spring, MD, United States and Patrice Brehmer, French Research Institute for Sustainable Development (IRD), Plouzané, France, Brest, France
Accounting for spatiotemporal variability in somatic growth in age composition data estimation for stock assessment models (637447)
Giancarlo M Correa1, Lorenzo Ciannelli1, Lewis Barnett2 and Stan Kotwicki2, (1)Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, (2)NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Eastern Bering Sea Groundfish, Seattle, WA, United States
Using DNA barcoding to describe the diversity of sharks found in the fishery in Puerto Rico (644240)
Glorimar Franqui-Rivera, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, Mayaguez, United States
Uncovering causal interaction networks between target species in a multispecies recreational fishery. (648310)
Kayla Blincow and Brice Semmens, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Marine Biology Research Division, La Jolla, CA, United States