HI51A:
Marine Renewable Energy: Resource Characterization, Environmental Impacts, and Societal Interactions I


Session ID#: 9249

Session Description:
The ocean represents a vast and largely untapped energy resource, which could be exploited as a form of low carbon electricity generation, and there is much research within the oceanographic community into resource characterization and environmental impacts. We seek contributions spanning a broad range of topics related to marine renewable energy, including wind, wave, ocean current and tidal resource assessment (and wave-tide interactions) over timescales ranging from semi-diurnal to decadal, and feedbacks between electricity generation and the resource at both device and array scale. This session is designed to gather and relate research methods, plans, and results from global investigations into field techniques, statistical modeling, and integrative mapping used to assess the presence, distribution, migration, dispersal, and/or abundance of species (seabirds, marine mammals, fish, sea turtles, and decapod crustacean) most likely affected by offshore renewable energy. The session will also include studies of physical impacts (e.g. impacts on sedimentary systems), and societal interactions. We also invite reports of research into potential or existing effects due to novel aspects of offshore renewable energy structures, such as the presence of artificial habitat, noise, electromagnetic field emission, and species barrier or displacement, as well as observational or modeling methodologies.
Primary Chairs:  Simon P Neill, Bangor University, Bangor, LL59, United Kingdom
Chairs:  M Reza Hashemi, University of Rhode Island, Department of Ocean Engineering & Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Ann Scarborough Bull, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior, Camarillo, CA, United States and Zhaoqing Yang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States
Moderators:  Simon P Neill, Bangor University, School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor, LL59, United Kingdom, Zhaoqing Yang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States, M Reza Hashemi, University of Rhode Island, Department of Ocean Engineering & Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States and Ann Scarborough Bull, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior, Camarillo, CA, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  M Reza Hashemi, University of Rhode Island, Department of Ocean Engineering & Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States
Index Terms:

4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4534 Hydrodynamic modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4558 Sediment transport [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4560 Surface waves and tides [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • EC - Estuarine and Coastal
  • IS - Instrumentation & Sensing Technologies
  • ME - Marine Ecosystems
  • PO - Physical Oceanography/Ocean Circulation

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

Determining Marine Renewable Energy Areas in the Bay of Fundy (91998)
Richard Karsten, Thomas Roc and Mitchell O'Flaherty-Sproul, Acadia University, Mathematics and Statistics, Wolfville, NS, Canada
Evaluating Tidal Energy Resource Assessment Guidelines (90200)
Kevin A Haas, Georgia Institute of Technology Main Campus, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Atlanta, GA, United States
A test-bed modeling study for wave resource assessment (88907)
Zhaoqing Yang1, Vincent S Neary2, Taiping Wang1, Budi Gunawan2 and Ann Dallman2, (1)Pacific Northwest National Lab, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)Sandia National Laboratories, Water Power Technologies, Albuquerque, NM, United States
The Effect of Waves on the Tidal-Stream Energy Resource (87998)
Matt James Lewis1, Simon P Neill1, Peter E Robins1 and M Reza Hashemi2, (1)Bangor University, Bangor, LL59, United Kingdom, (2)University of Rhode Island, Department of Ocean Engineering & Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States
Laboratory Study on the Effect of Tidal Stream Turbines on Hydrodynamics and Sediment Dynamics (87815)
Laurent Amoudry1, Rafael Ramirez-Mendoza1, Thorne Peter1, Stuart McLelland2, Stephen Simmons3, Daniel R Parsons4 and Lada Vybulkova5, (1)National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, United Kingdom, (2)University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom, (3)University of Hull, School of Environmental Sciences, Hull, United Kingdom, (4)University of Hull, Hull, HU6, United Kingdom, (5)CFD People Ltd., Airdrie, United Kingdom
Do Offshore Wind Farms Influence Marine Primary Production? (86926)
Jacqueline F Tweddle1,2, Rory B. O'Hara Murray2, Matthew Gubbins2 and Beth E Scott1, (1)University of Aberdeen, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Aberdeen, United Kingdom, (2)Marine Scotland Science, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Tidal Farm Array Optimization: Dynamics, Engineering, And Environment (90990)
Kristen M Thyng, Texas A & M University College Station, College Station, TX, United States, Simon Wolfgang Funke, Simula Research Laboratory, Oslo, Norway and Thomas Roc, Acadia University, Canada
Bridging Scales: A Model-Based Assessment of the Technical Tidal-Stream Energy Resource off Massachusetts, USA (93115)
Geoffrey W Cowles1, Aradea Hakim1 and James H Churchill2, (1)UMass Dartmouth, Fisheries Oceanography, New Bedford, MA, United States, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole, MA, United States