ME14D:
Exploring the Spatial and Temporal Scales of Marine Animal Response to Global Change Posters


Session ID#: 9500

Session Description:
As anthropogenic influences on marine environments increase, there is considerable scientific and practical interest in understanding how animals will respond. There is increasing awareness, however, that understanding how species will fare requires explorations of the interface between the response of individual organisms to the suite of co-occurring stressors and larger scale variability in exposure and sensitivity. There are strong temporal factors, such as adaptation and seasonality which interact with spatial components, such as connectivity and inter-population variation in environment and sensitivity, that will influence the capacity of a species as a whole to cope with environmental changes. New approaches, including studies of seasonality, application of time-series datasets, comparative analyses across broad spatial scales, integration of circulation patterns, observations of the influence of migration and dispersal on adaptation responses, and multi-generational experiments will pave the way for this more nuanced understanding of species response. Innovative multidisciplinary approaches require opportunities for researchers approaching these larger scale problems to interact, cross-fertilizing ideas. This session thus aims to bring together studies applying a number of disciplines to characterize the influence of temporal and spatial variation on the genetics, ecology and physiology of marine animals, particularly in the context of changing physical and chemical landscapes.
Primary Chairs:  Leocadio Blanco-Bercial, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda
Chairs:  Hannes Baumann, University of Connecticut, Department of Marine Sciences, Groton, CT, United States, Melissa H. Pespeni, University of Vermont, Department of Biology, Burlington, VT, United States and Amy E. Maas, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda
Moderators:  Melissa H. Pespeni1, Amy E. Maas2, Hannes Baumann3 and Leocadio Blanco-Bercial2, (1)University of Vermont, Department of Biology, Burlington, VT, United States(2)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda(3)University of Connecticut, Department of Marine Sciences, Groton, CT, United States
Student Paper Review Liaisons:  Leocadio Blanco-Bercial, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda
Index Terms:

1630 Impacts of global change [GLOBAL CHANGE]
4203 Analytical modeling and laboratory experiments [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4215 Climate and interannual variability [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4858 Population dynamics and ecology [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
Co-Sponsor(s):
  • PC - Past, Present and Future Climate

Abstracts Submitted to this Session:

 
Effects of light conditions and temperature gradients on vertical migration behavior of larval Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogramma) (93322)
Kelly Rae Flanders, Hatfield Marine Science Center; Oregon State University, Newport, OR, United States and Ben Laurel, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Fisheries Behavioral Ecology Program, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Newport, OR, United States
 
Degrees of Isolation: The Impact of Climate Change on the Dispersal and Population Genetic Structure of Two Antarctic Fish Species (87981)
Emma Frances Young1, Mark Belchier1, Michael Paul Meredith2, Niklas Tysklind3 and Gary R Carvalho4, (1)British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)NERC British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)UMR EcoFoG, French Guiana, (4)Bangor University, School of Biological Sciences, Bangor, United Kingdom
 
Metabarcoding Baseline for the Sargasso Sea Zooplankton Community (89054)
Samiah Alam and Leocadio Blanco-Bercial, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda
 
Diel, Seasonal, and Interannual Variability in Abundance of Major Mesozooplankton Taxa in the Sargasso Sea as Related to Changing Environmental Parameters (92084)
Jami Ivory, Deborah K Steinberg and Robert J. Latour, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, United States
 
Seasonality and the Response of the Thecosome Pteropod Limacina retroversa to CO2 in the Gulf of Maine (88735)
Amy Maas1,2, Ann M Tarrant2, Alexander John Bergan2, Aleck Zhaohui Wang3 and Gareth L Lawson2, (1)Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George's, Bermuda, (2)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Biology, Woods Hole, MA, United States, (3)Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States
 
Projected shifts in copepod surface communities in the Mediterranean Sea under several climate change scenarios (89658)
Fabio Benedetti1, François Guilhaumon2, Fanny Adloff3, Jean-Olivier Irisson1 and Sakina-Dorothee Ayata1, (1)UPMC-LOV, Villefranche sur mer, France, (2)UMR MARBEC - UM2/IRD/CNRS, Montpellier, France, (3)CNRM/GMGEC-MétéoFrance, Toulouse, France
 
Modeling Global Relationships Between Climate and Scyphozoan Jellyfish Blooms (91760)
Natasha Henschke, Princeton University, Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton, NJ, United States, Charles A Stock, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States and Jorge L Sarmiento, Princeton University, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton, NJ, United States
 
Variable responses in marine community structure to changes in temperature (92008)
Patrick H Flanagan, Rutgers University, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
 
Variation in the Adaptive Capacity of Plankton Alters Marine Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change. (92490)
Colin T Kremer1,2, Charles A Stock3, David Vasseur1 and Jorge L Sarmiento2, (1)Yale University, Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, New Haven, CT, United States, (2)Princeton University, Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton, NJ, United States, (3)Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, United States
 
The Influence of Life History Variability on Population Connectivity: Development and Application of a Trait-Based Biophysical Model of Individuals (90936)
Jennifer Wong-Ala, Anna B Neuheimer, Mark Hixon and Brian Powell, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, United States
 
A Biophysical Model for Hawaiian Coral Reefs: Coupling Local Ecology, Larval Transport and Climate Change (93772)
Maia Rose Kapur, University of Hawaii at Manoa, marine biology, Honolulu, HI, United States
 
Who's your daddy? Using RADseq to explore survival and paternity in the clownfish, Amphiprion clarkii. (93264)
Michelle Ranee Stuart, Rutgers University New Brunswick, Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, New Brunswick, NJ, United States and Malin L. Pinsky, Rutgers University, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
 
Changes in Reef Fish Abundances Associated with the Introduction of Indo-Pacific Lionfish to the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary: a Twenty Year Time Series. (89711)
Megan Hepner1, Frank E. Muller-Karger1, Steve Gittings2 and Chris Stallings1, (1)University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL, United States, (2)NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries, Silver Spring, MD, United States
 
The coral reef balancing act: a multi-scale analysis of accretion and erosion along a natural environmental gradient (92489)
Nyssa Silbiger, University of California at Irvine, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Irvine, CA, United States and Megan J. Donahue, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology, Honolulu, HI, United States
 
American Horshoe Crab (Limulus polyphemus) : Population Ecology within the Northern Gulf of Mexico (88401)
Sean C Carter, Colorado College; Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Ruth H Carmichael, University of South Alabama, Department of Marine Sciences, Mobile, AL, United States, Maury Gordon Estes Jr, Alabama A&M University, Huntsville, AL, United States and Madison McBarnes, Kalamazoo College, Biology, Kalamazoo, MI, United States
 
Nitrous oxide production from temperate and tropical oyster species in response to nutrient loading (93658)
Heather Chan, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, United States, Melanie Garate, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, United States and Serena Moseman-Valtierra, University of Rhode Island, Department of Biological Sciences, Kingston, RI, United States
See more of: Marine Ecosystems